Are You Still Lose Weight

“Cheating” is the act of deceiving others or being dishonest. The word conjures up images of copying someone else’s answers during an exam, fudging your taxes, or counting cards.  Needless to say, these are not positive activities.  But does the same negative connotation apply to a cheat meal (or day) for a person on a diet?  Can “cheating” on one’s diet be beneficial—even fun—or is it just setting the stage for dieting disaster?

As a registered dietitian, I am often asked about cheat meals and cheat days.  Usually the dieter seems to be asking the question out of desperation. He or she often mentions feeling obsessed and exhausted of counting calories. “I want to have a cheat day once a week where I can eat whatever I want without worrying about my calories,” they often say.  “But will this cheat day hurt my weight loss?” In other cases, people eat so “clean” (i.e. perfect) on their diets that they simply can’t keep up with it day in and day out. They feel that they “need” a cheat meal or day to look forward to and keep them accountable to their strict diet all the other days.

I think everyone would agree that even though it has been documented to help people lose weight, daily calorie counting is a big pain in the butt.  You have to read labels, measure portions and keep track of so many details. Food selection is constantly on your mind.  Focusing so much on calories makes it easy to get into the trap of trying to eat a strict diet of “good” foods, then falling off the wagon and overeating the “bad” foods you tried to avoid.  Your vocabulary and thoughts are consumed with extremes: good foods vs. bad foods, cheating vs. being good, restricting vs. overindulging. It is easy to see why you’d want to “cheat” on a system like this. But is cheating on your diet really the answer?